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A Review on Anticancer Drug from Marine

Authors(5) :-Omkar A Patil, Prajkta S Patil,Trupti D Dudhgaonkar, Shriniwas K Mohite, Chandracanth S Magdum

The marine environment is a rich source of both biological and chemical diversity. It is very much likely that marine organisms would be wonderful source of biologically active molecules The collection of the marine therapeutics includes molecules with antibiotic, antiviral, antiphrastic, analgesic and anticancer agent from bacteria, cyanobacteria, tunica, fungi, sponge This reviewfocuses on the latest studies and critical research in this field and evidences the immense potential ofmarine organisms as sources of bioactive peptides and other anticancer biomolecules Various anticancer compounds like Aplidine, Bryostatin-1, Didemin B, Dolastation, Ecteinascidine with diverse modes of action, such as, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, anti-microtubule havebeen isolated from marine sources. Traditional chemotherapeutic agents have a range of side effects likefatigue, gastrointestinal distress and depression of immune system which introduces the these sources have been shown to have antioxidantactivity and cytotoxic effect on several human cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, ovarian, melanoma, breast, bladder, neuroendocrine, prostatic, colon and non-small cell lung cancer very potently.
Omkar A Patil, Prajkta S Patil,Trupti D Dudhgaonkar, Shriniwas K Mohite, Chandracanth S Magdum
Marine Organisms, Bryostatin-1, Dolastation, Human Cancers
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Publication Details
  Published in : Volume 2 | Issue 4 | July-August 2016
  Date of Publication : 2016-08-30
License:  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Page(s) : 236-242
Manuscript Number : IJSRST1622111
Publisher : Technoscience Academy
PRINT ISSN : 2395-6011
ONLINE ISSN : 2395-602X
Cite This Article :
Omkar A Patil, Prajkta S Patil,Trupti D Dudhgaonkar, Shriniwas K Mohite, Chandracanth S Magdum, "A Review on Anticancer Drug from Marine", International Journal of Scientific Research in Science and Technology(IJSRST), Print ISSN : 2395-6011, Online ISSN : 2395-602X, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp.236-242, July-August-2016.
Journal URL : http://ijsrst.com/IJSRST1622111

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